Medieval Democracy – 8 things you (probably) didn’t know about medieval elections
Mar03

Medieval Democracy – 8 things you (probably) didn’t know about medieval elections

Democracy isn’t a word that you would ordinarily associate with the Middle Ages. The most common perception of this time is of Kings, Bishops, Feudal over lords and right at the bottom of the ‘social heap’, the peasant all of them with no say in government. In fact it turns out this is not overall an entirely true picture and that elections were a reasonably common occurrence

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Did the British’s experiences in the Boer War help or hinder fighting strategies at the start of the First World War?
Feb21

Did the British’s experiences in the Boer War help or hinder fighting strategies at the start of the First World War?

World War I for the British – Would it have been worse or was it indeed better than it could have been because of Britain’s experiences in the Boer War some 12 to 15 years earlier ?

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Roman Jersey
Feb17

Roman Jersey

Unlike Guernsey the Roman presence in Jersey is not so clear cut. In this article we look at some of the new emerging evidence for Roman ‘occupation’ in Jersey or ‘Andium’ as it was probably know by the Romans.

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Kaiser Wilhelm II – The Man Who Changed Europe Forever
Jan24

Kaiser Wilhelm II – The Man Who Changed Europe Forever

History can often turn on the actions of a single individual, either singly or over a period of time. Personality traits and the whims, especially of absolute monarchs, for either ill or good, can shape our world. Such could be said of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.

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Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom
Jan10

Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom

On the 10th January 49 BC Julius Caesar led one of his legions across a small stream called the Rubicon, thus defying the Roman Senate and breaking the Lex Cornelia Majestatis that forbade a general from bringing an army out of the province to which he was assigned. Turning to his lieutenants just before he crossed, Caesar remarked bitterly, ‘Jacta alea est’ (The die is cast.)

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Think You’ve got a Handle on Christmas? – A Yuletide Quiz to Test Your Knowledge
Dec20

Think You’ve got a Handle on Christmas? – A Yuletide Quiz to Test Your Knowledge

How well do yo think that you know Christmas? In this article are some Christmas factoids listed with possible answers. See how many you get right.

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How did people in the Middle Ages Celebrate Christmas?
Dec13

How did people in the Middle Ages Celebrate Christmas?

Today we celebrate Christmas with a spirit of merriment, gift giving and (over) indulgence. But that begs the question … How was Christmas celebrated in the past? Or more specifically for our aricle here – the Middle Ages?

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How to Smug a Guy – An old Guy Fawkes Tradition
Nov04

How to Smug a Guy – An old Guy Fawkes Tradition

The British are a nation with a long and proud history steeped in ritual and tradition. None more so when it comes to the rather odd celebration of ‘Guy Fawkes Night’ where we gleefully celebrate the burning of a Catholic traitor caught trying to blow up the houses of parliament. However there is one rather odd tradition surrounding this event that we would suggest is best not revived – ‘Smugging a Guy’.

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The Day King John Commited Murder and the Channel Islands lost a potential Duke
Oct28

The Day King John Commited Murder and the Channel Islands lost a potential Duke

History can often turn on the actions of a single individual. April the 3rd 1203 was such a day when King John committed murder. If he hadn’t committed this heinous crime then the whole history of Guernsey and the Channels Island could have been radically different.

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1066 and all that … the day the Channel Islands became part of England
Oct14

1066 and all that … the day the Channel Islands became part of England

On Sunday the 14th October 1066 ‘William the Bastard’, Duke of Normandy (andthe Channel Islands), invaded and defeated the Anglo Saxon king of England, so that henceforth the Bastard was to be forever known as William the Conqueror. In this article we look how at how he won at Hastings.

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The Communism Experiment – What if Lenin hadn’t died ?
Sep20

The Communism Experiment – What if Lenin hadn’t died ?

The great communist experiment that started in 1917 after the Bolshevist revolution in Russia ultimately failed with the faill of the Soviet Union. In this article we look at the events that surrounded his death in 1924.

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Why did Europe Colonise the New World and not the other way around ?
Sep02

Why did Europe Colonise the New World and not the other way around ?

Why did Europe Colonise the New World and not the other way around ? – according to a bold theory put forward by anthropologist Jared Diamond – The answer may be linked to the shape of the continents which meant that Europeans had more advanced technology and worse diseases than Native Americans.

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Do we know who the Mona Lisa was ?
Aug30

Do we know who the Mona Lisa was ?

Commissioned around 1503, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is perhaps the most famous portrait in the world. But who was the Mona Lisa?

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Was Jesus a Real Person ?
Aug16

Was Jesus a Real Person ?

Should we regard the Jesus described in the New Testament as a myth. That is that Jesus either didn’t do the things he’s said to have done in the New Testament, or even that there was a real person on whom the Jesus legend was based ?
In this article we look at evidence OUTSIDE of the Bible.

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The First Cities
Jul12

The First Cities

Thursday July 12 2007 was a seminal day (apparently). On that day the a United Nations report, that coincided with World Population Day, revealed that for the first time in history, more people were now living in cities than rural areas. But how did this come about ? In this artice we look at the key argricultural and technological developements needed for this to happen.

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