An Ancient Mystery Solved … Hierapolis, “The Gates to Hell” & Instant Death
Sep14

An Ancient Mystery Solved … Hierapolis, “The Gates to Hell” & Instant Death

One of the world’s most chilling ruins is the Ploutonion at Hierapolis, “the Gates to Hell”. Here crowds watched priests lead animal sacrifices down into a cave, where they died mysteriously as if dragged down to the underworld. No one knew how they did it, that is, until very recently.

Read More
Did You Know … Between AD 208 and 211 the entire Roman Empire was governed from York
Jul24

Did You Know … Between AD 208 and 211 the entire Roman Empire was governed from York

A Rare Known Factoid …  “Between AD 208 and AD 211 the entire Roman Empire was governed from York.” Some Random Romano British Factoids For 3,000 years, chickens were farmed primarily for their eggs. Only when the Romans came to Britain did it dawn on them to eat the bird. Ruyton-XI-Towns, Shropshire, is the only place in Britain whose name contains Roman numerals. When the Romans first arrived in Britain, they found...

Read More
Before Mechanised Transport How Far Could Someone Expect to Travel In a Single Day on Horseback or Stagecoach?
Jul20

Before Mechanised Transport How Far Could Someone Expect to Travel In a Single Day on Horseback or Stagecoach?

Before Mechanised Transport How Far Could Someone Expect to Travel In a Single Day on Horseback or Stagecoach?

Read More
A History of Guernsey’s Official (& Unofficial) Island Flags
Jul06

A History of Guernsey’s Official (& Unofficial) Island Flags

A History of Guernsey’s Official (& Unofficial) Island Flags

Read More
A Naval Historical First – The Battle of the Ironclads
Mar09

A Naval Historical First – The Battle of the Ironclads

When we picture Naval vessels in a historical context we often see them in some very fixed regonisable form we rarely think about them in their interim ‘ugly duckling’ phases. Such was the state of affairs when the naval first of the ‘The Battle of the Iron Clads’ occurred.

Read More
How Medieval People Used to Walk
Feb16

How Medieval People Used to Walk

I expect that you’ve heard of ‘Doing the Hussle’ or maybe even ‘Doing the funky Chicken’ (they’re dances by the way), but what about ‘Doing the Medieval Walk’? No ?
Well, it’s not a dance craze but a real historic thing.

Read More
Christmas Traditions – The First Ever Nativity Play
Dec12

Christmas Traditions – The First Ever Nativity Play

Even in modern, secular Britain there is one tradition that still holds sway at Christmas – The Christmas Nativity Play. In this article we look at the 800 year old origin of this Christmas institution.

Read More
Christmas is Cancelled – The Puritan assault on Christmas during the 1640s and 1650s
Dec05

Christmas is Cancelled – The Puritan assault on Christmas during the 1640s and 1650s

As the year 1645 came to a close Englishmen had little cause for celebration. The country was 3 years into a vicious civil war and if that wasn’t bad enough any of the traditional festivities that they might have looked forward to had been abolished by order of the two Houses of Parliament sitting at Westminster – this was Puritan England’s assault on Christmas.

Read More
The Black Death in the Channel Islands
Oct06

The Black Death in the Channel Islands

Not the most pleasant of subjects but when the ‘great mortality’ as it was called struck the Channel Islands it left in its’ wake a scarred population, decimated in numbers and traumatised in the minds and bodies of all islanders.

Read More
Celtic Guernsey and the King’s Road Settlement
Sep15

Celtic Guernsey and the King’s Road Settlement

The largest area of Celtic settlement we know of on Guernsey was to the east of King’s Road, on the outskirts of St Peter Port. But was life like for the celtic peoples of Guernsey and even who were the celts ?

Read More
Constantinople – Where (Middle) East Meets West
Sep08

Constantinople – Where (Middle) East Meets West

On the 28 March 1930 after 1,599 years, ten months and seventeen days the great city of Constantinople officially became Istanbul. It was on this day that the Turkish Post Office formally changed the name by which it had been informally identified since some time in the 13th century. A Long History A Greek City There has been a town on the site of modern Istanbul since at least the 7th century BC, when it was settled by Greeks. They...

Read More
Firsts of World War I – Gas
Sep01

Firsts of World War I – Gas

If we were to ask : Who used gas first in WWI and when? The chances are that most people wouls say ‘The Germans as 2nd Yrpres in April 2015’. The surprising fact is that it was not.
It was , in fact, the French, who first used gas as a weapon of war and they did it in the very first month of the war

Read More
Reading Ancient ‘Unreadable’ Texts Lost for Centuries
Aug18

Reading Ancient ‘Unreadable’ Texts Lost for Centuries

Any Bibliophile will appreciate, or at least empathise (if you’ve never had the opportunity), the exquisite pleasure of gazing upon an ancient book or scroll and reading the words engraved on its pages hundreds or thousands of years ago.

Read More
The Normans – A Timeline
Aug04

The Normans – A Timeline

Guernsey and the Channel Islands were very much at the heart of the old Duchy of Normandy and then in 1066 we were propelled into the wider world when our Duke, William the Bastard defeated the English King Harold at Hastings. In this artilcle we outline some of the defining moments in the history of the Norman dynasty.

Read More
Was King John really that bad?
Aug01

Was King John really that bad?

If there’s one English Monarch who’s consistently had a ‘bad wrap’ it’s King John I. He’s the ultimate in abuse of absolute power, an archetypal villan – portrayed as the cruel King oppressing his people with taxes and arbitrary justice. But is this true ? Was his rule really as bad as folklore seems to say ?

Read More
Page 1 of 1012345...10...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest