Asterix – Guernsey’s Own Roman Wreck
Jun02

Asterix – Guernsey’s Own Roman Wreck

On Christmas Day 1982 local Diver Richard Keen spotted the remains of a large wreck sticking out from the mud directly between the pierheads of St Peter Port harbour. It turned out to be the largest, most complete, seagoing Roman ship surviving outside the Mediterranean.

Read More
The founding of the Eternal City – Rome – Fact & Fiction
Apr21

The founding of the Eternal City – Rome – Fact & Fiction

On the 21st April 753 BC, according to Plutarch, the city of Rome was founded. In this article we look at the myths and legends surrounding the foundation of the ‘Eternal City’.

Read More
Secrets of The Bayeux Tapestry : Hidden Meanings & Gestures
Apr18

Secrets of The Bayeux Tapestry : Hidden Meanings & Gestures

The Bayeux Tapestry is an historical artifact that never fails to impress depicting as it does such a pivotal moment in British and Channel Island history, that of the invasion & conquest of England by William the Conqueror in 1066. But look closely and you will come across oddities that are hard to explain, mysterious characters, some named, some not, appear in the main body and borders. Add to that some of the cuirious rather theatrical gestures they appear to be making and there emerges a sense of mystery.

Read More
Modern Compensation Culture and the Ancient Practice of Wergeld
Apr07

Modern Compensation Culture and the Ancient Practice of Wergeld

If there is one thing that is a blight on modern life it is the rise of ‘compensation culture’. The idea that someone else is always to blame and you are entitled to some compensation no matter what. But the origins of this are far older than you might think.

Read More
How did WWI End ?
Apr04

How did WWI End ?

The First World War, which has become a byword for a static war of attrition, ended in 1918 just as it had begun in 1914, as a mobile war. But it was a final throw of the dice by the Germans in the Sping of 1918 that was to be a ‘catalyst of the end’.

Read More
Why didn’t Napoleon Ever Invade the Channel Islands?
Mar31

Why didn’t Napoleon Ever Invade the Channel Islands?

Given that Britain and France were at war almost permanently between 1792 and 1814, it does seem strange that Napoleon Bonaparte made no effort to occupy what were almost exclusively French-speaking islands just a few miles off the French coast.

Read More
The Last Witchcraft Trial in Guernsey
Mar10

The Last Witchcraft Trial in Guernsey

As the 19th century gave way to the new 20th century few could appreciate how much of the old cosy world order was being swept away by industialisation, science and the increasing political enfrachisment of the masses. In Guernsey at this time there was to be one last gasp of the old superstition and occult, ‘The Last Witchcraft Trial in Guernsey’.

Read More
Medieval Democracy – 8 things you (probably) didn’t know about medieval elections
Mar03

Medieval Democracy – 8 things you (probably) didn’t know about medieval elections

Democracy isn’t a word that you would ordinarily associate with the Middle Ages. The most common perception of this time is of Kings, Bishops, Feudal over lords and right at the bottom of the ‘social heap’, the peasant all of them with no say in government. In fact it turns out this is not overall an entirely true picture and that elections were a reasonably common occurrence

Read More
Did the British’s experiences in the Boer War help or hinder fighting strategies at the start of the First World War?
Feb21

Did the British’s experiences in the Boer War help or hinder fighting strategies at the start of the First World War?

World War I for the British – Would it have been worse or was it indeed better than it could have been because of Britain’s experiences in the Boer War some 12 to 15 years earlier ?

Read More
Roman Jersey
Feb17

Roman Jersey

Unlike Guernsey the Roman presence in Jersey is not so clear cut. In this article we look at some of the new emerging evidence for Roman ‘occupation’ in Jersey or ‘Andium’ as it was probably know by the Romans.

Read More
Alderney Invasion – The night 4 Alderney Militiamen Repelled 200+ Frenchmen
Jan27

Alderney Invasion – The night 4 Alderney Militiamen Repelled 200+ Frenchmen

4 Alderney Militiamen Vs 200+ Frenchmen : Conclusion = obvious – the French lost

Read More
Kaiser Wilhelm II – The Man Who Changed Europe Forever
Jan24

Kaiser Wilhelm II – The Man Who Changed Europe Forever

History can often turn on the actions of a single individual, either singly or over a period of time. Personality traits and the whims, especially of absolute monarchs, for either ill or good, can shape our world. Such could be said of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.

Read More
Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom
Jan10

Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom

On the 10th January 49 BC Julius Caesar led one of his legions across a small stream called the Rubicon, thus defying the Roman Senate and breaking the Lex Cornelia Majestatis that forbade a general from bringing an army out of the province to which he was assigned. Turning to his lieutenants just before he crossed, Caesar remarked bitterly, ‘Jacta alea est’ (The die is cast.)

Read More
Think You’ve got a Handle on Christmas? – A Yuletide Quiz to Test Your Knowledge
Dec20

Think You’ve got a Handle on Christmas? – A Yuletide Quiz to Test Your Knowledge

How well do yo think that you know Christmas? In this article are some Christmas factoids listed with possible answers. See how many you get right.

Read More
How did people in the Middle Ages Celebrate Christmas?
Dec13

How did people in the Middle Ages Celebrate Christmas?

Today we celebrate Christmas with a spirit of merriment, gift giving and (over) indulgence. But that begs the question … How was Christmas celebrated in the past? Or more specifically for our aricle here – the Middle Ages?

Read More
Page 2 of 1012345...10...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest