The Day St George lost his head … literally
Apr19

The Day St George lost his head … literally

On the 23rd April 303 AD in Nicomedia, (near today’s Istanbul), St George of dragon fame was beheaded on the orders of the Roman emperor Diocletian. As you’re no doubt aware he went on to become the patron saint of Englend, and quite a few other places as well as it happens. The story of his life and death is no less fascinating.

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4 More Myths About World War I Debunked
Apr12

4 More Myths About World War I Debunked

2014 was the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, the supposed “war to end all wars”. It was the first ‘modern mechanised war’ and a lot of myths about it have been built up over the years. In this article we look at some of the bigee “facts” that are just plain wrong

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The Declaration of Arbroath (Scotland declares independence)
Apr05

The Declaration of Arbroath (Scotland declares independence)

If the 4th July 1776 is remembered for the momentous statement that begins, When in the course of human events … then Saturday the 6th April 1320 should be noted for an equally stirring declaration of independence when another nation struggled for freedom from English rule.

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The Diet of the Ancient Romans – More unusual than you’d think
Mar25

The Diet of the Ancient Romans – More unusual than you’d think

Archaeologists exploring sewers and cesspits at Herculaneum in 2013 made the startling discovery that, contrary to the long-held belief that ancient Romans survived on a basic diet of bread and olive oil, they in fact enjoyed a rich variety of fish, fruit and spicy dishes

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Pivotal Moments : March 8 1265 – The First English Parliament
Mar08

Pivotal Moments : March 8 1265 – The First English Parliament

There are key moments in history when on the decisions and actions of men the course of human history is changed forever. Sunday March 8th 1265 was such a day when the actions of the nobleman Simon de Montfort still reverberate down the centuries to us today, for on that day the first ever English Parliament sat.

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Never Surrender – The Japanese Soldier who was still fighting World War II 29 years after it ended
Feb26

Never Surrender – The Japanese Soldier who was still fighting World War II 29 years after it ended

On the 17th January 2014 Hiroo Onoda, an old Japanese war veteren, died at the age of a 91 – nothing unusual in itself – the generation of soldiers who fought in War War II gets smaller every year. However unlike his comrades this Japanese imperial soldier fought the war a staggering 29 years longer than anyone else

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The Death of a Saint and the Start of a Romantic Tradition – The Martyrdom of St Valentine
Feb12

The Death of a Saint and the Start of a Romantic Tradition – The Martyrdom of St Valentine

Monday 14th 270 AD was quite a day for Bishop Valentine of Interamna (now Terni in Umbria), for on that day, in Rome, he was stoned to death and then beheaded on the orders of Emperor Claudius II Gothicus.

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Onward Christian Soldiers : When the Salvation Army took on the Nazis – In Guernsey
Feb05

Onward Christian Soldiers : When the Salvation Army took on the Nazis – In Guernsey

The German Occupation of the Channel Islands is a dark period of the islands history. A time when slave labourers were worked to death in the islands to help complete Hitlers Atlantic wall defence system. Practical resistance was virtually impossible. However one courageous member of the Salvation Army stands out – Major Marie Ozanne

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Alderney’s War
Jan29

Alderney’s War

The atrocities committed by the Germans during World War II weren’t limited to mainland Europe and the notorious concentration camps. Sadly the Channel Islands had it’s very own death camps, administered and run by the Nazi Organisation Todt

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The Poppy and the Bleuet – Symbols of Enduring Rememberence
Nov10

The Poppy and the Bleuet – Symbols of Enduring Rememberence

“In Flanders Fields” is a poem which contains some of the most famous lines ever written about the Great War. In it lies the seeds of why we use the Poppy as the symbol of remembrance.

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Otto von Bismarck – The Iron Chancellor
Nov03

Otto von Bismarck – The Iron Chancellor

On the 1st of April 1815 a little boy was born in Kniephof, Prussia, a little boy destined to be known by history as “The Iron Chancellor”. A man around whom history would pivot, a man who would be the subject of many historical “What Ifs” with regard to his demise at the hands of the unstable “Kaiser Bill” and the path to World War I.

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When Worlds Collide : The Romans and Jersey’s Celtic Treasure Hoards
Oct23

When Worlds Collide : The Romans and Jersey’s Celtic Treasure Hoards

Jersey is unique in many ways but there is one that is particularly curious. Of all the channel Islands it seems to have had the most treasure hoards of all. The latest, the Catillon II hoard, had over 70,000 coins in it plus 2 golden torqs. Even more curious is that 4 similar hoards were all buried at the same time – the mid 1st Century B.C. So what was going on?

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Sir Isaac Brock, Guernseyman and Hero of Upper Canada
Oct13

Sir Isaac Brock, Guernseyman and Hero of Upper Canada

Guernseyman General Sir Isaac Brock is credited with saving Canada for the Empire from the attack by the Americans 1812. Knowing how much the Canadians gave in manpower and support in the 2 World Wars to Britain, who knows, but if he had failed the history and fate of modern Britain may have been very different indeed.

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To Discover Strange New Worlds – Columbus’ Venture into the Unknown
Oct09

To Discover Strange New Worlds – Columbus’ Venture into the Unknown

Wednesday October 12th 1492 was no ordinary day, for on this day Christopher Columbus reached the New World. On that day, after sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, the Italian explorer sighted a Bahamian island, believing he had reached East Asia.

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How did Farming Arrive in Europe ?
Aug28

How did Farming Arrive in Europe ?

The first modern humans in Europe were hunter-gatherers who arrived around 40,000 years ago. But around 9,000 years ago the first farmers arrived. These farmers came from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East – but how ?

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