The Battle of Jersey
Jan03

The Battle of Jersey

Guernsey and Jersey, along with the other Channel Islands lived, for hundreds of years right on the front line of conflict between Britain and France. Islanders had to train and be ready to fight to defend their homes at a moments notice. On 6th January 1781 this threat went from ‘potential’ to ‘actual’ when a French force landed undetected in Jersey. The ensuing conflict became known as “The Battle of Jersey”.

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The Jersey Cow
Feb15

The Jersey Cow

The Jersey breed originates from the Island of Jersey in the Channel Islands. Today, outstanding herds of Jerseys can be found from Denmark to New Zealand, from Canada to South America, and from South Africa to Japan.

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Power to the People – The Clameur de Haro
Oct26

Power to the People – The Clameur de Haro

The ordinary Guernseyman, and indeed all Channel Islanders, have an extra-ordinary legal power at their fingertips, available no whereelse in the world. The “Clameur de Haro”.

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Jersey Royal – King of Potatoes
May04

Jersey Royal – King of Potatoes

Jersey Royals have been grown on Jersey for over 130 years. But how did such a small place as Jersey become so renowned for a variety of potato ?

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Ormer Casserole
Jan10

Ormer Casserole

Ormer is the local name for what are known worldwide as abalones and is found on Guernsey & Jersey shores. This casserole recipe has been around since at least 1673.

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Donkeys, Toads & Crows
Sep09

Donkeys, Toads & Crows

Every country has it’s own national symbols. The Channel Islands are no different and there’s a surprising array of animals ascribed to each island and their people.

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Flags of the Channel Islands
Mar25

Flags of the Channel Islands

Many of the flags recall links to the The Duchy of Normandy. The Duchy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. It was created by the treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte in 911 out of concessions made by King Charles, and granted to Rollo.

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Victor Hugo’s Exile
Mar11

Victor Hugo’s Exile

Victor Hugo left France in 1851 for an exile that would last 19 years. After a short period in Jersey he came to Guernsey and was instantly captivated by the island. During 15 years on the island he wrote some of his most famous works.

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