Roman Jersey
Feb17

Roman Jersey

Unlike Guernsey the Roman presence in Jersey is not so clear cut. In this article we look at some of the new emerging evidence for Roman ‘occupation’ in Jersey or ‘Andium’ as it was probably know by the Romans.

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Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom
Jan10

Crossing the Rubicon – Caesar and the Birth of an English Idiom

On the 10th January 49 BC Julius Caesar led one of his legions across a small stream called the Rubicon, thus defying the Roman Senate and breaking the Lex Cornelia Majestatis that forbade a general from bringing an army out of the province to which he was assigned. Turning to his lieutenants just before he crossed, Caesar remarked bitterly, ‘Jacta alea est’ (The die is cast.)

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The Diet of the Ancient Romans – More unusual than you’d think
Mar25

The Diet of the Ancient Romans – More unusual than you’d think

Archaeologists exploring sewers and cesspits at Herculaneum in 2013 made the startling discovery that, contrary to the long-held belief that ancient Romans survived on a basic diet of bread and olive oil, they in fact enjoyed a rich variety of fish, fruit and spicy dishes

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The Languages (& Translations) of the Bible – Linguistic Conundrums
Jul28

The Languages (& Translations) of the Bible – Linguistic Conundrums

Much of the Christian Bible was written in Greek so why don’t we read the Bible in Greek? How many languages has it been translated into? and Why does it matter? It turns out that the answer to the last question is very important indeed when you study the linguistic differences, subtle nuances and context in which writtings can appear within a passage of scripture.

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Caesar Decrees a new Calendar – and we’re still using it (mostly)
Feb03

Caesar Decrees a new Calendar – and we’re still using it (mostly)

The calendar we use today is little different to that decreed by Julius Casear over 2,050 years ago. In this article we look at the details surrounding this historic and seminal event.

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Ancient Celtic offshore Banking
Aug22

Ancient Celtic offshore Banking

It looks like Jersey may have been an offshore banking centre for far longer than anyone has suspected. In June 2012 two metal detectorists uncovered a hoard of a staggering 70,000 late Iron Age and Roman coins. Their incredible find has since turned out to be the largest hoard ever found in Jersey.

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How did the Romans do the calculations necessary for construction and other purposes using Roman numerals?
Jul15

How did the Romans do the calculations necessary for construction and other purposes using Roman numerals?

The Romans were skilled architects and engineers the likes of which the world had not seen before. They built huge elaborate and perfectly balanced structures that are not only still standing but still in use 2,000 years later. However their number system, whilst useful, was anything but straight forward. So how did the Romans manage to do the calculations necessary for construction using this rather unwieldy number system ?

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Why is a circle divided into 360 Degrees ?
Jun24

Why is a circle divided into 360 Degrees ?

Stop and think for a moment , we live in a world where our main number system is in base 10 so why do we have the rather odd base 60 for time and angles. Why not decimal time or decimal segments to represent angles in a circle ?

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What have the Romans ever done for us?
Apr25

What have the Romans ever done for us?

For Monty Python fans the question “What have the Romans ever done for us ?” will recall the irreverent comedy of the film ‘The Life of Brian’ . There is a serious question behind this frivolous skit. The Roman Empire and the culture it exported was the most advanced the world had ever seen. Indeed after the fall of the Roman Empire it never got back up to the same level, in Western Europe, until many centuries later.

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Beware the Ides of March : The Great Caesar is Assasinated
Mar14

Beware the Ides of March : The Great Caesar is Assasinated

“Beware the Ides of March!”, the augur Spurinna had warned a few days before the 15 March in 44 BC , but the great Julius Caesar had brushed him aside. Was he not, at 55, the most powerful man in the civilised world?

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Why Do Clocks Run Clockwise ?
Sep10

Why Do Clocks Run Clockwise ?

We’re accustomed to seeing movement in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction, such as races, but is there any particular reason why clocks run ‘clockwise’?

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The Railway – Not just for Choo Choos
Sep03

The Railway – Not just for Choo Choos

If you thought that the railway was invented along with the steam locomotive then you’d be wrong. Railways existed long before steam, long before even the birth of Christ.

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The Origin of Writing
Aug30

The Origin of Writing

Writing – The invention that enabled science and knowledge to flourish. However it seems that is wasn’t invented for prose or love poems or literature but for the more mundane and prosaic task of taxation and bookkeeping.

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Origin of the Months and Days of the Year
Jan01

Origin of the Months and Days of the Year

We use them everyday to order our lives to record, analyse and make sense of things. We’re talking about the days and months of the year. What are their origins ? You may be surprised in that they all have origins deep within our pagan past.

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Invasion – Rome’s Assault on Brittania
Nov13

Invasion – Rome’s Assault on Brittania

Rome’s invasion of Britain in 43AD would change the native Britons lives and culture forever. But this wasn’t the first Roman invasion. There was another nearly 100 years earlier. We look at both in this article.

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